stardust

 

stardust

‘stardust’ 2016

He stared up at the stars: and it seemed to him then that they were dancers, stately and graceful, performing a dance almost infinite in its complexity. He imagined he could see the very faces of the stars; pale, they were, and smiling gently, as if they had spent so much time above the world, watching the scrambling and the joy and the pain of the people below them, that they could not help being amused every time another little human believed itself the centre of the world, as each of us does.

from Stardust, by Neil Gaiman

 

I have been playing around with this one for a while now and posted the original not long ago with some other medium format pictures of seed heads. I came back to it recently because I started reading Neil Gaiman’s Stardust and the thought of falling stars and magical faerie worlds brought it to mind. Anyway, here it is again, slightly re-worked.

A very happy New Year and thank you to all of my readers. Here’s hoping 2016 brings you much magic and serendipity!

 

 

© images and words by Emily Hughes, 2016

black and white

black and white 1 (1 of 1) black and white 2 (1 of 1)

 

I’m trying to work on a new black and white image, so I’ve been playing around with a few ideas.

 

© images and words by Emily Hughes, 2015

reaching for star dust

I love photographing seed heads. It’s a mild obsession of mine. They are a popular subject these days, it seems, appearing on everything from kitchenware to lino prints. I’m a big fan of Angie Lewin’s lino cuts especially. I think it is a bold simplicty in their structural form, and  an unassuming elegance which makes them so enticing and lends itself so well to so many different media. I have always felt like they are beseeching in some way; offering up their fragile form to the wide open sky. To me, they have become a symbol of the infinite, innocent generosity of nature’s gentle rhythm.

 

Usually, I would reach for the macro lens and get in close (as I did hereherehere, and here again!), but I decided to try out my rollei with some black and white medium format shots for a different perspective, still keeping the aperture as wide as I could. Unfortunately I had a bit of a light leaking incident, which is why the last image has a flecked, slightly grainy appearance (the film was fine grain), but I decided not to correct this. I quite like the otherworldly effect. It’s a bit like a meteor shower, or some other celestial phenomenon. As if their willowy limbs are tentatively reaching out to greet a scatter of star dust.

 

seed heads 1 seed heads 2 seed heads 3 seed heads 4

 

© images and words by Emily Hughes, 2015

seed head study

I love shooting macros at this time of year. Autumn is such a rewarding subject, just as nature is settling, cocooning; turning inwards for the long winter ahead. I never tire of photographing seed heads either. Endlessly captivating, they offer forth their generous, basin-like heads, sheltering a bounty of tiny jewels secreted within.  These ones looked still young to me, and they stood out, green and proud amongst a scene of quiet decline around them.

seed head 6seed head 1 seed head 2 seed head 3 seed head 4 seed head 5 © images and content Emily Hughes, 2014

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